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Sid

Kicking over knocked-down players

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From the collected clarifications:

Quote

KD models may not engage a kicker but can intervene (no TN change, but -1 dice pool).

This ruling has always felt strange to me, I guess it derives from the following part of the Kicking Sequence in the rulebook: "Each enemy model not engaging the kicking model, with any part of its base on the ball-path between the kicking model and the target of the Kick, is an intervening model."

But a kicking model can kick the ball over an obstruction or a friendly model with the same accuracy as normal, why does an opponent on his bum on the ground suddenly become a problem? Anyone else finds it weird as well and would like to see that changed? I mean adding "that isn't suffering the knocked-down condition" to the description of the intervening model.

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21 minutes ago, ForestRambo said:

I mean they're on the floor, but they still can act.

Somehow same logic doesn't apply to combat: that guy is flailing at my teammate when I'm right next to him, but I don't even try to be a hindrance. Or he simply walks away from me and I don't go for the ankles in an attempt to trip him. Cause I'm on the floor... 

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31 minutes ago, Sid said:

Somehow same logic doesn't apply to combat: that guy is flailing at my teammate when I'm right next to him, but I don't even try to be a hindrance. Or he simply walks away from me and I don't go for the ankles in an attempt to trip him. Cause I'm on the floor... 

I think there a distinct difference between inhibiting someones ability to swing a hammer while on the floor compared to stretching your leg up and luckily knocking a ball off it's path. 

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I always pictured it as whoever is on the floor might try to get up or pull themselves to their knees while you’re kicking. They’re in no state to actually attack or even grab at another person, probably still dazed, but they can easily put their head/backside accidentally in the way of a shot that cuts too close.

Friendlies probably get yelled at to stay down as the ball is chipped over their head :)

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On 1/10/2018 at 1:58 PM, Sid said:

From the collected clarifications:

This ruling has always felt strange to me, I guess it derives from the following part of the Kicking Sequence in the rulebook: "Each enemy model not engaging the kicking model, with any part of its base on the ball-path between the kicking model and the target of the Kick, is an intervening model."

But a kicking model can kick the ball over an obstruction or a friendly model with the same accuracy as normal, why does an opponent on his bum on the ground suddenly become a problem? Anyone else finds it weird as well and would like to see that changed? I mean adding "that isn't suffering the knocked-down condition" to the description of the intervening model.

He's not wrong. Only one thing to do.

 giphy-downsized-large.gif

GG GB, it was fun.

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Also keep in mind that this is a game, and sometimes for the purposes of game play and balance, there has to be a few stretches of logic.

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1 hour ago, Redtiger7 said:

Also keep in mind that this is a game, and sometimes for the purposes of game play and balance, there has to be a few stretches of logic.

@Redtiger7 Nonsense! We often see bears with tusks strapped to their massive skulls rampaging through the Canadian Rocky Mountains out west here ...handing out friendly bear hugs! :P 

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