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james ewing

Substantial paper dolls

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I have taken the liberty of making my paper dolls a little more substantial.

 

It is a simple enough process, using things you can pick up from your local model/hobby shop and a little patience

 

You will need:-

A print out of the Paper Dolls

An A4 sheet of 3mm ABS plastic (or which ever thickness you wish to use. A word of caution though, using plastic over 2mm makes it easier to cut and gives the miniatures a little heft. Anything thinner and it may jump around a bit as you're cutting it)

Fine sand paper

Paper glue

Super glue

A piercing saw and blades

A sharp knife (I recommend something like a Stanley knife. Something hardy that you can put a lot of pressure on)

A ruler

 

start by cutting each of the paper dolls out as neatly as possible. Fold them completely in half (as you would if you were making normal paper standees) and cut along the fold (above their head.) Cut off the semicircle of base paper that is attached to the bottom of each half and set them asside for now.

 

Take your sheet of ABS plastic and cut a strip 30mm wide. This can be done quickly and easily by using your sharp knife. Using your ruler to guide you, score a deep line (starting with a light scoring line to stop the blade from wondering when you start apply pressure) then snap it off by bending it over the edge of the table, applying pressure to both halves.

 

Lay the first paper doll on the strip of plastic to measure how big a piece of plastic you need. Using the knife method above, cut of a piece big enough for the first figure.

Give the plastic a light sanding with your sand paper to give the glue something to anchor to. Glue the paper doll to either side of the plastic, taking care to get them as symmetrical as possible.

Cut another square of plastic big enough to clue both sides of the paper base to and follow the same guidelines above.

 

When you are happy that glue has set use your piercing saw to cut out the pieces. As you can see, I have left a small border around the figures. This of course, is down to personal preference.

A word of advice for those who have little to no experience with a piercing saw:-

As you can no doubt see, the piercing saw blade is extremely thin. Around the same thickness as 3-5 human hairs. If you move the saw too quickly the plastic will melt around it. This can cause problems as, when you slow down or stop, the plastic can grab the blade and it will probably snap as you try to free it. If you use steady strokes this may not be a problem. Take the time to get to know the saw and how it behaves with the job in hand.

Also, remember that it not you that is cutting the plastic, but the saw. DO NOT but too much pressure on the blade as it will snap and you will not get a clean cut. This is where your insurmountable patience comes into play. Just move the saw and let it do its job.

 

When you have cut out your pieces you will notice that the paper on the reverse side is a little ragged around the cut edge. Take your sharp knife and carefully trim off the bits that are too ragged. Neaten the edges as you see fit.

 

Stand you newly cut out figure on its base in the position you intend the finished piece to be. Draw around the bottom of the figure onto the paper base then cut away the paper of the base where the figure will be standing. This will give you two clear plastic edges (the feet of the plastic figure and a strip of plastic in the base) to be glued together with the super glue.

 

Scrape away any paper glue and paper residue left on the base and glue the figure to the plastic base. You may find a few rough edges that need a little further cleaning but that is pretty much it.

 

Enjoy :)

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These look excellent, and with 8-9 month before we get our hands on some figures  :( It's something we would all benefit from doing.

 

The fact I nearly lost 3 fingers just cutting the teams out of card with scissors puts me off a little  :unsure:

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As I say Andy, you will need to be careful, but if you take time to get to know the saw and how it behaves it will get easier.

 

They do feel good to play with. The plastic gives them a nice weight

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Wow, these look really professional, great idea to build them like this. I did not realise it's that long until we get the real miniatures... I mean, I KNOW it, but... that's long, to long for simple paper.

Did I get it right back and front of miniatures are no longer in the rules?

Staff:
Will we get some paper dolls for the other guilds, too?
 

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They've said the Masons and Morticians will be with us in a little bit, they're just taking a bit longer to get sorted than they'd hoped. So we'll see them soon I imagine.

 

And yup, there's no facing rules any more so Front and Back don't matter.

 

Also, I need to go find some 3mm sheet. And a printer that will do good old A4 instead of blasted letter size (which chops the ends off the base discs when you print the page...). These look awesome.

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Mako, Have a look on Ebay for A4 styrene sheet. It will probably pop up in the modelling section.

 

I found some last night http://www.ebay.co.u...=item232be7207b that is really reasonably priced and with free delivery.

 

It would be good to see some more of these in circulation. At least it will tide us over until we get the awesome miniatures that are being produced for this game

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I glued both sizes of the image of the players to a piece of regular corrugated cardboard from a box, cut them out and then pushed them into spare Warmachine slotter bases, a bit sturdier and interchangeable to boot.

Another option could be using foamcore.

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Thanks James, these look great! Been thinking of making them sturdier for a while, it's nice to have some instructions to follow to get them looking as good as possible. Hopefully will be able to do the Morticians and Masons soon too...

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Yes Ninestein, I'm really looking forward to having a crack at the Mason and Mortician paper dolls when they are released.

 

I'm really looking forward to building some scenery for my guild when I finally decide which one I'm going to use :)

 

I had thought I would stick with either the Butchers or the Fishermen but now I've seen the stat cards for the other teams I'm back to square one again! :)

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Yes.

 

If you cut out the paper doll and cut out a piece of plastic the same size using your sharp knife you should end up with a piece of plastic with four very straight edges.

 

If you stick the paper doll to one side, getting it as square as you can up the corner of your piece of plastic, you can do the same on the other side. That way, when you cut them out it will all be done in one go.

 

Trying to trim the other doll to fir the plastic you have cut is very time consuming and you will never get a clean result. Better to do it all in one go.

 

The blade of the piercing saw is extremely thin, almost the same thickness as around 3 human hairs. It is also sometimes refered to as a "jewellery saw"

 

It can be tricky to use but patience is the key

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A few words of advice then Old-Man.

 

As far as blades are concerned you want something reasonably course if you are cutting plastic. The number of the blade represents how many teeth it has per10mm. The lower the number the coarser the blade.

For 3mm plastic I would recommend a 0/3-0/4. See link:-

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Saw-blades-piercing-144x-jewellers-clockmakers-10-GRADES-HAND-SAWS-TOOL-craft-/200942132717?pt=UK_Hand_Tools_Equipment&var=&hash=item2ec9159ded

 

As for the saw itself, it is always best to spend a little in the knowledge that you are going to get a tool that you will be able to rely on for years. I spent £10 on mine almost 10 years ago and it has never let me down.

You want something adjustable like this:-

 

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Rolson-Adjustable-Piercing-Fret-Saw-Frame-Jewellers-to-fit-Blades-50mm-to-125mm-/141069192248?pt=UK_Crafts_JewelleryMaking_GL&hash=item20d8610c38

 

Hope that helps mate. I'll look forward to seeing your work :)

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